Do you e-read?

Friday, February 4, 2011


Like so many of you, I received an e-reader for Christmas. For months I had been cataloguing the pros and cons of Nooks, Kindles, Sony readers, etc., all the while completely unconvinced that I wanted one at all. Then my husband unexpectedly bought me a Kindle for Christmas and all those lists went out the window. Of course I was excited and started playing with it immediately.

I named my Kindle Argus, after Odysseus’ faithful dog in The Odyssey. I’ve tentatively downloaded some books and read user reviews of different versions, but I have yet to dive in and read a book cover-to-cover. I think it’s amazing that I can hold the complete works on Shakespeare in my hand, but I’m having a hard time picking up the Kindle over all my lovely printed books. I know it will never replace those for me, but I would like to be able to take my Kindle on trips and feel comfortable reading it.



So here’s my question. What book would you recommend I read first? I want something that I can’t put down, so I’m forced to read the whole thing electronically. I would also like a recommendation this isn’t filled with beautiful writing I want to linger over and highlight. I think I’d prefer print copies for that. I want something fast-paced, thrilling or hilarious that will suck me in and make me accept Argus as a viable reading option. It doesn't have to be a book you read on an e-read, just one that was an addictive read.

Photos by moi.

19 comments:

bibliophilica said...

I was converted into an e-reader last year. My Nook was the "gateway" drug and then, when I got my iPad, I become pretty much addicted. Probably 60% of the books I read last year were e-reads, and that percentage is much higher if I only look at the second half of the year. The first book I read was Stephen King's Under the Dome, and I chose it for some of the same reasons you mention. I didn't think I would be lingering over and highlighting a lot of it, just reading "recreationally."

I have two recommendations for you. The first is Andrew Davidson's The Gargoyle which, if you can get past the first part - which deals somewhat graphically with the narrator's recovery as a burn victim - is an awesome story. The second is Peter Brett's The Warded Man, which was totally out of my normal reading comfort zone but was quite good as well; I particularly enjoyed the mIn characters in tis book. Check out their summaries on goodreads.com or somewhere and see if you might like them. They were two of my favorites from last year. Happy reading!

-Jay

Kathmeista said...

I don't e-read. I could, there's an iPad in the house which hubby and I 'share' (read: its his and I occasionally play games on it) but I don't really fancy it. Nothing against e-readers, I just like my printed books.

Recommendation for e-reader: Come Back by Claire and Mia Fontaine. It's a memoir penned by mother and daughter after the daughter recovered from a drug addiction. For me it was a page-turner but not one I'd want to keep forever on my shelf.

Falaise said...

I still can't decide whether to become an e-reader. I should because of the storage space (I live in space-constrained central London!) but still can't get over the whole "It's not a real book" thing.

Teacher/Learner said...

I'm not too attracted by e-readers (no reason why comes to mind) but it sounds like a neat gadget to explore. I'd say read a fast-paced mystery/thriller by James Patterson or Stephen King that will get the blood pumping :)

Jeanne said...

Orson Scott Card is always fast-paced addictive reading for me, but I don't like to buy his books because of the Mormon hate organizations he supports. There's always Nick Harkaway's The Gone-Away World, which was slow-starting but then completely addictive if you like SF at all. And there's Anne Tyler--my favorite of hers is Dinner At the Homesick Restaurant.

Brenna said...

I love that you named your ereader!

Melissa Mc (Gerbera Daisy Diaries) said...

I bought a Nook about a month ago and have read one book on it...a free LM Montgomery classic I downloaded from Guterburg Project.

I haven't read a full lenght novel on it yet, so I"m not sure I can recommend anything..but I really like it, especially when I'm reading in bed -- not having to turn physical pages is a huge advantage. But I will never give up paper.

Jessica said...

I would read an old classic becuase they tend to be the kind of books that have really really small print and the advantage with the kindle is that you can of course increase the size.

Enbrethiliel said...

+JMJ+

Oh, dear! I don't eRead at all and don't foresee myself with an eReader any time in the future. (You know that "Late Adapter" demographic from Marketing class? I'm the poster girl!)

I think that if I had one, I'd stick to downloading the free classics. If I actually have to pay for books, I'd rather have the usual paper and print kind. ;-)

Having said that, I don't know which classics would make good, quick reads and don't have beautiful passages for you to underline! I'll have to think about it some more and get back to you. =)

Avid Reader said...

Thank you guys for your wonderful suggestions! I've heard of a few, The Gargoyle and the Anne Tyler book, but all of these are getting added to my list (print or e-reader, it doesn't matter).

I am having a hard time choosing it over my books, but maybe one day.

Jenners said...

I think once you get into reading your first book, you'll forget all about it being an e-reader. I was surprised how quickly I adjusted and found it almost preferable to reading a "real" book from a physical comfort point of view. My suggestion is to read a big, involving chunkster ... like "Lonseome Dove" by Larry McMurtry.

(Diane) Bibliophile By the Sea said...

Have you read Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter; Tom Franklin? I just finished it and had a hard time putting it down -- good story, part mystery.

Selene said...

I eread on my iPad, mostly using either the Kindle or iBook apps. It takes a bit of getting used to, I do sometimes want to wear a sign that says "reading a book, not Facebooking!"

I do a mix of ereads and paper books. I love my paper books and think I'll always hang on to them. My husband on the other hand has already vowed never to read another paper book and has moved to "Books 2.0" lol

Becky said...

I have had a Kindle for a while, but find it hard to get accustom to. Maybe it is old habits or just the love of feeling the pages beneath my fingers. I have downloaded several free ebooks, but did read Steven Wessenfals POD on ereader because I was writing an article on post apocalyptic books. I miss the cool cover artwork too.

Avid Reader said...

Jenners - That's what I'm hoping will happen. I've read Lonesome Dove and something like that might really do the trick.

Diane - I haven't, that might be a good one.

Selene - I'll definitely never be able to stop reading my paper books. They're just too wonderful.

Becky - I've downloaded a few free classics, but I'm not doing great at getting accustom to it either.

Shon said...

My first eBook on the Kindle was Good Enough to Eat by Stacey Ballis. I read it on the train to NYC. It was very easy for me to get into. Surprisingly it didn't take me very long to adjust to reading on the Kindle (I thought it would take several attempts to feel comfortable reading on it). My suggestion is to start with a book that you've been wanting to read for awhile. It may help you "forget" you're reading on an ereader as you quickly get lost into the story.

Bybee said...

I'm so so close to getting an e-reader. On the verge. How do I know? I'm thinking of names for it.

LindyLouMac said...

I would suggest you go for something completely different from your normal choice!
The Hating Game by Talli Rolland or Exit The Actress by Priya Parmar.
I have read an reviewed the first as a ebook and will be doing so with the latter.
I love my Ereader but so I can review books I might not be able to get straight away otherwise.

Avid Reader said...

More great recommendations. I love it!

Shon - I am hoping that I will take to it quickly once I download a good book.

Bybee - A good name is essential for me feeling connected to any pieces of technology.

LindyLouMac - Speed is definitely in the e-readers favor. Instant gratification when you see a book you want.